Two Bear Cubs by Markusie Papigatok

$295.00

Artist:                   Markusie (Markoosie) Papigatok

Community:        Cape Dorset/Kinngait

Year:                      2021

Media:                   Serpentine

Description

One’s heart goes out to these Two Bear Cubs by Markusie Papigatok. Playful and content, and so happy together.

Markoosie (Markusie) Papigatok is a prolific sculptor based in Kinngait (Cape Dorset), NU. He hails from a family of renowned carvers. He has observed and learned many things from his uncle well known artist Ashevak Tunnillie.  His late Grandfather is the famous Kabubuwa Tunnillie and his brother is carver Johnny Papigatok.  His mother Kumaajuk Tunnilllie and grandmother Tavaraq Tunnillie were also carvers in Cape Dorset.   Using both hand and power tools, Papigatok is known for making smaller, more intimate sculptures with a whimsical flare.

The most common of Papigatok’s subjects are his dancing bears. Featuring polished stone, rounded lines, a plump body and an enthusiastic stance.

Papigatok’s endearing sculptures have gained a following worldwide and have appeared in exhibitions throughout Europe, Canada and the United States. A number of his pieces are continuously featured in the Canadian Art Gallery in Basel, Switzerland. His artwork can also be found in the public collections of the Musee d’art Inuit Brousseau in Quebec City, QC, and the Canada Council Art Bank in Ottawa, ON, among others.

This is an endearing carving of Two Bear Cubs by Markusie Papigatok

Additional information

Dimensions 6.75 × 1.5 × 1.25 in

Biography Markusie (Markoosie) Papigatok

Markoosie Papigatok
Alternative Names: Papigatok Papigatok, Markusie Papigatuk, Markosie Papigatok, Papipakatuk Papigatok
Medium: Sculptures, Carving
Artistic Community: Kinngait (Cape Dorset), NU
Date of Birth: Kinngait (Cape Dorset), NU 1976
Markoosie Papigatok is a prolific sculptor based in Kinngait (Cape Dorset), NU. Born in Puvirnituq Nunavik, QC, he hails from a family of renowned carvers, including his grandfather, Qavaroak Tunnillie (1928-1993). Largely self-taught, Papigatok learned by observing those who worked around him, like his uncle Ashevak Tunnillie (1956-2018). Using both hand and power tools, Papigatok is known for making smaller, more intimate sculptures with a whimsical flare.
The most common of Papigatok’s subjects are his dancing bears. Featuring polished stone, rounded lines, a plump body and an enthusiastic stance. Papigatok also enjoys experimenting with different types of stone, occasionally using multiple varieties within his carvings to signify a transformation taking place.
Papigatok’s endearing sculptures have gained a following worldwide and have appeared in exhibitions throughout Europe, Canada and the United States. A number of his pieces are continuously featured in the Canadian Art Gallery in Basel, Switzerland. His artwork can also be found in the public collections of the Musee d’art Inuit Brousseau in Quebec City, QC, and the Canada Council Art Bank in Ottawa, ON, among others.
EXHIBITIONS
Small Treasures 2017 Jan – Feb 2017 Inuit Gallery of Vancouver
Small Sculptures by Great Artists Nov 2015 – Jan 2016 Feheley Fine Arts
Small Sculptures by Great Artists Nov 2014 – Jan 2015 Feheley Fine Arts
PUBLIC COLLECTIONS
Canada Council Art Bank Ottawa, ON, Canada
Musee d’art Inuit Brousseau Quebec City, Quebec

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